written work presented including essays W r i t i n g

written work presented including essays W r i t i n g

This activity is designed to demonstrate your ability to apply the concepts presented in Module 1 to your personal and professional life by developing your own person code of ethical communication with others.

Examine the terms, concepts, and theories presented in this learning module including the NCA Credo on Ethical Communication. Develop your own personal code of ethical communication with a list of at least ten principles. After you have developed your list, consider how you have applied or will apply these principles of ethical communication with others. This activity aligns with module outcome 2.

Writing Requirements

  • Write a three to four paragraph essay of at least 500 words.
  • Be certain to provide in-text citations.
  • Create a reference list for all sources you used.

Content Requirements

  1. As you’ve learned, the NCA Credo provided a preamble for readers that introduces the premise for their code of ethical communication. Provide your own preamble for your personal code of ethics.
  2. List your own ten principles of ethical communication.
  3. Explain how you have applied or will apply these principles of ethical communication in your relationships with others such as family, friends, co-workers, or acquaintances. Be certain to provide examples that support your explanation. Give at least one example of how you have applied or will apply the principles in your electronic communication in personal or professional settings or social networks.

This course uses the American Psychological Association (APA) format for scholarly writing. References and citations must adhere to the proper format for all written work presented including essays, discussion postings, and essay exams. Online tips for using APA style may be found at the Excelsior Online Writing Lab. (Links to an external site.) Your research should be documented by citing one or more credible sources such as the course readings and videos, scholarly articles and books, or educational websites. Wikipedia and any similar online reference sites where the content may be authored by anyone are not considered credible sources for scholarly writing.