“ secondary discourses ” B u s i n e s s F i n a n c e

“ secondary discourses ” B u s i n e s s F i n a n c e

As always, it is extremely important and necessary that you refer to your readings and class lectures for your posts.

  • This exercise builds on the previous week’s discussion. It strives to help you understand the cultural processes involved in Hegemony (198-99), hegemonicprocesses in which we accept social relations as normal (195) and commonsensical.  Advertisements oftentimes do the work of hegemony, by producing images to reinforce dominant ideologies (193), by employing what Stuart Hall calls “the politics of signification”(199) where meaning is created through images of the world.
  • Explain, in your own words the meaning of hegemony, the idea of consent and other relevant ideas mentioned above. Using the same ads from last week, explain how the hegemonic process work in these two instances. What are some of the consensus being promoted in these ads, and what are the processes involved in making them normal.  The ads present us the normal, the everyday, then what is NOT normal or everyday, what kinds of social relationships are not commonly expressed in advertisements? What are not being shown in these ads?

Examine the two ads on cars, one from 1959, one contemporary. First explain the ads, literally what are in the ads, what objects, what characters, what backgrounds, etc. Then analyze the “secondary discourses” in the ads – the dominant ideologies. Rather than pay attention to the sales pitch, explore the kinds of social relationships that are the background, setting, and context for the sales pitch. What do the ads suggest about relationships between, for example, men and women, adults and children, money and happiness, class and so on? Or what is represented as a good life? 

Then analyze the “secondary discourses” in the ads – the dominant ideologies. Rather than pay attention to the sales pitch, explore the kinds of social relationships that are the background, setting, and context for the sales pitch. What do the ads suggest about relationships between, for example, men and women, adults and children, money and happiness, class and so on? Or what is represented as a good life? the wagon as a living room, cost is reasonable which allows any class acess to it luxury quality. This ad holds many meaning if you ask me it shows a white perfect family living there American live with their pet at the same time displays male supremacy how the male is in charge . The men having conversation about the car leaving the woman to take care of the child which is why the child is in direct view of the child while also showing her interest in being part of the conversation she technically cant be included . This also shows us that having material things is a big part of being happy . 

The description of the Ford ad is apt, but where is the analysis for the Chevy ad? You want to say more about how white family is represented as the ideal, a dominant ideology that neglect other races and ethnicites, which are also parts of society and also people with families.

Both ads depict families, nuclear families, and that is another dominant ideology of what a family should be, heterosexual, and nuclear (2 generations). Therefore, a family is not quite a family if it only has one parent, parents of the same gender, or family without children

You should write these in regular prose, rather than a list. You also want to separate the two ads, so I can tell what goes where. The background of the Ford ad is a suburban or even country settings, with a big house behind. You also want to say what do the men and women stand for, and let’s not forget the children — husband, wife, their children.