g ., personal relationships ). B u s i n e s s F i n a n c e

g ., personal relationships ). B u s i n e s s F i n a n c e

Only answer The question, use my assessment results to answer these question

The icEdge assessment and self-reflection exercise is designed to help you become more aware of
and better understand how you communicate with others. In this workbook, you will focus on
your individual results (you will have a chance to reflect on your group compassion results in
another exercise). Before diving into the workbook, please consider the following:

  1. You will reflect on the four main characteristics of your communication style:

    • Message – the way you use and interpret subtle (vs. literal) meaning and emotion in
      communication
    • Sensory – refers to the way you attend to and communicate through the physical,
      auditory, and vocal space shared with your counterpart.
    • Time management – refers to the way you attend to and manage time, i.e. focusing
      more on clock time or allowing events to unfold naturally.
    • Relationship – refers to the way you adjust communication to your counterpart’s status
      and relationship with you.
  2. Please plan to spend some quality time responding to the questions in this workbook.
    The more effort you put into self-reflecting and understanding yourself, the more you will
    get out of this activity.
  3. As you work through your responses, please remember that our cultural environment
    largely influences our communication styles. For example, research has shown that direct
    verbal assertiveness, linear logic, straightforwardness, and transparent messages (e.g.,
    “saying what you mean and meaning what you say”) are characteristic of low-context
    communication styles common in individualistic cultures. Silence, non-verbal cues and
    behaviors (e.g., reading between the lines), spiral or fuzzy logic, and self-humbling tone are
    characteristic of high-context communication styles common in collectivistic cultures.
    However, it is important to keep in mind the relative nature of the cultural
    environment when reflecting on and discussing communication styles. There are
    considerable variations in commutation styles within cultures as well. One could use direct,
    low-context communication styles when interactive with one group (e.g., coworkers) or
    discussing one matter (e.g., contract), and prefer indirect, high-context communication
    styles when interacting with a different group (e.g., family) or discussing a different matter
    (e.g., personal relationships). For instance, we cannot assume that a German person will
    automatically communicate using low-context communication styles, while a person from
    Japan will automatically use high-context communication styles.
    The best strategy is to observe each particular person within each particular
    communication context and figure out what communication styles they might be using
    based on the characteristics of low-context communication styles (e.g., direct verbal
    assertiveness, linear logic, straightforwardness, etc.) and high-context communication
    styles (e.g., non-verbal cues, self-humbling tone, etc.). Then you can adjust your own
    communication styles to best encode messages that you’d like your communication
    counterparts to receive and adjust your interpretations of your counterparts’ messages to
    better understand the meaning they are trying to transmit to you in their messages.