brief “ literature review ” section W r i t i n g

brief “ literature review ” section W r i t i n g

  1. Page 1: title page in APA 7th Edition format, double spaced lines, with running header is required. The title must be consistent (and symbolic of) with your central argument.
  2. Page 2: an Abstract with 100 to 150 words followed by “Keywords” with no more than six keywords is required.
  3. Page 3: an Introduction with at least one level subheading after the main heading “Introduction” is required; do not exceed a one-page Introduction.
  4. Pages 4 to 5 will include a brief “Literature Review” section. This section is a story of the literature which supports your central theme, or argument; hereafter, your focus should be on telling a compelling story, building a case to convince your audience to accept your argument with published articles.
  5. Pages 6 to 8: you will use the evidence you have collected from credible sources; use your references to your advantage. Create appropriate main headings and subheadings, but not too many of them. Use published articles to support your knowledge claims, e.g. Bell (2010) says… Franks (2013) reports… etc. Make an attempt to persuade your audience through the rhetorical appeals (a good blend of emotion, logic, and the credibility of experts you cite). Think of yourself as a lawyer, sifting through mountains of evidence, trying to win your case. Your main purpose is to support your position and convince your audience they should advocate that which you advocate, and how they would benefit if they agree with your argument.
  6. Your properly tilted Table 1 and Figure 1 will be strategical placed within the body of the paper, and descried within the text prior to presenting Table 1 and Figure 1.
  7. Your second draft manuscript will not exceed 10 pages in length, including references; however, no manuscript will be less than 9 pages in length, including references.
  8. Your “References” sections will include 8 to 15 credible sources actually used in the body of the manuscript, as proof you used to support your knowledge claims: a good blend of books, periodicals, scholarly refereed journal articles, etc. is expected. Online materials should be used with caution, unless they are from credible sources (Bureau of Labor Statistics; Wall Street Journal Online; use Wikipedia with caution and verify!). Once again, the reference list must be composed of works actually cited in the manuscript. If the source was not cited by you in the manuscript, don’t put it in the reference!

*Note: The focus of my grading will now be centered on argumentation, creativity and expression. I will also be looking for English grammar issues. Try to avoid problems with expression. Recall, creative thinking (expression) is different than logical thinking (editing). First be creative then be logical. You should create as much volume as possible, consistent with your argument. Try to state the status quo problem you think can be resolved with a managerial communication solution. This is your proposition, a statement that can be resolved by proof. Focus on a level and function of management. Then, begin working on paragraph development (unity), as explained in the lectures and in Written Communication Principles that I distributed in class. Use sentences efficiently. Use topic sentences in all paragraphs. Use transition sentences to link paragraphs. Try and avoid passive voice (The bill was passed by the legislature). Use active voice (The legislature passed the bill.). Grammar and sentence structure are easy to fix when proof reading the penultimate version of your manuscript. Express one idea per sentence; furthermore, if the sentence seems ambiguous, it probably is ambiguous. Watch your word choice and usage. Avoid acronyms [Security and Exchange Commission is better than “SEC” unless SEC will be used several times in the paper] if you can. This second draft of your manuscript should be reflective of graduate level work. Cite a credible source if you feel the need to support a claim you have made. A working knowledge of the literature, at least from what is included in your references section, should be used fluidly throughout. Class readings, your literature review, and the two textbooks should guide your pen. Remember, your manuscript is an engagement in an ongoing debate on a management communication proposition; view it as solution to a business problem—so be affirmative! The burden of proof is on you!